Orthodox Jews use gene science to protect family and tradition

JDate, founded in , is an online dating site that matches potential couples based on shared interests and hobbies. Its younger cousin JSwipe, which debuted in , is a Jewish complement to nondenominational swipe-based dating apps like Tinder or Bumble. An increase in swiping may not immediately translate into lasting Jewish connections. But Yarus said that an unexpected shake-up in dating protocol might encourage people to experiment with new dating etiquette. Historically, Yarus said, app users have been reluctant to adopt this practice. ShidduchView users answer an extensive questionnaire about their values, interests, and expectations for a spouse. Elchonen sees ShidduchView as a way to make the Orthodox matchmaking system available to a wider swath of the Jewish population. He stressed that the app was in the works long before coronavirus.

Are matchmakers for Jews necessary?

I know this too. And I have no doubt that it is normal in practice in many even in some nominally Haredi reviews, I’m sure , but the fact that that’s public opinion surprises me. Halachically speaking, opinions vary approximately from “shaking hands is jewish” to “shaking reviews is not older”, and from “hugging is a biblical prohibition of kareis” to “hugging is a rabbinic prohibition the transgression of which is biblically prohibited “.

Yocheved Lerner-Miller is a matchmaker for Orthodox Jews who Born Jill Lerner into a nonpracticing Jewish family in Brooklyn, she was.

The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. This subject was studied with 24 ultra-Orthodox Jewish mothers of persons with mental illness who live in a relatively closed religious community.

While participating in the Keshet educational program designed for family caregivers in mental health, they wrote Meaningful Interactional Life Episodes that involved a dialogue exchange in their lives. Qualitative analysis of 50 episodes illuminates the significant role that religious and cultural norms have in the perceptions of what are considered stressors and the dynamics in these families surrounding these stressors.

The necessity and value of incorporating cultural competence into family educational programs and interventions is emphasized, as this may contribute to the potential use and success of mental health service models within a population that essentially underutilizes these services. Keywords: Keshet course; Meaningful Interactional Life Episode; events analysis; female caregivers; matchmaking; mental illness; religion; religious community; religious traditions; ultra-Orthodox Jews; wounded storyteller.

Abstract The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. Publication types Research Support, Non-U.

Tradition meets technology

The breakup had been painful, but Rivka was looking to get back on the dating circuit. But a matchmaker, of sorts, beckoned. And its merging of old-school and new-school technologies occupies a potent middle ground in a fast-changing Orthodox dating environment.

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In one hand she holds a filing card with a photograph stapled to it. In the other is her phone. She peers at the card and tells the rabbi on the end of the line: “Her parents are separated, not divorced. Sirota flips the card over and reads out a couple of names and phone numbers: references provided by the young woman for community elders who will attest to her character.

All being well, a meeting between the pair will be arranged and then, Sirota hopes, an engagement. Sirota, 67, is a shadchan, a traditional Jewish matchmaker. Beneath the vaulted ceilings of her house in Mea Shearim, one of the earliest settlements outside the Old City walls and home to the strictest adherents of the Jewish faith, a wicker basket of filing cards lies on a large cloth-covered dining table.

This Orthodox Jewish Matchmaker’s Unconventional Path

Deseret News – Sunday, September 16, Jews beefing up holiday security Rabbi Benny Zippel of Chabad Lubavitch said his congregation will have “regular security but we don’t want to turn synagogue into a military barrack. We normally have some type of security. The fact that we experienced what we did this past Tuesday, we need to work to sensitize ourselves to what the people in the Middle East go through almost on a daily basis. Literally from one day to the next, we might not be here tomorrow, so I think we vow to make the best of life while we’re around.

The new quarters — Lubavitcher Rabbi Benny Zippel before operated out of his home — mean the organization is in the city to stay, at least for the foreseeable future.

Throughout the world, our matchmakers work with Jewish singles who consider themselves “Just Jewish”, Conservative, Modern Orthodox or Yeshivish/Black.

Tonight: Sen. Tim Scott speaks to kick off the Republican National Convention. You get a blood test in high school, and a card with your identification number on it. For comparison, today about 1 in 71 Americans are Jewish. But then came some bottlenecks — drastic reductions in the Jewish population. These were following major world events — the rise of Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire; and the start of Rabbinical Judaism — which made the communities more closed off.

And when a population grows from a smaller offshoot, you lose genetic diversity.

Orthodox Jewish Singles Virtual Meet & Greet

Matchmaker, matchmaker, make me a match. While going to a matchmaker in might seem old-fashioned, for some Orthodox Jews, this is still a common practice. But what about Orthodox Jews who come from more unconventional backgrounds, like trying to remarry or marry later in life? The year-old who lives in Kensington, Brooklyn told the New York Times about why she chose to work with this demographic — as opposed to the usual suspects:.

I deal with divorced people. I deal with older singles who are already in their 30s, 40s, 50s and beyond.

The two were introduced through a shidduch, or Jewish matchmaker, to bring a greater perspective to their lives as an orthodox couple in a.

With the world going virtual, several Yeshiva University students are undertaking a tough challenge during the pandemic: dating during coronavirus. Social distancing has limited singles from meeting easily, putting a strain on their dating lives. Several Jewish individuals have attempted dating alternatives such as Zoom speed events and Facebook group chats. Their service differs from typical shidduch matchmaking businesses. Several years later, both as students in YU, they began to set people up on dates.

They have already seen success — the first of their matches got engaged in May They started off small, writing names of potential matches down on a whiteboard. Since both are highly outgoing women who are involved in various communities of people their age, they found that pooling their lists of friends proved to be a very effective way to set people up.

Although some of their matches did not go past the first few dates, Ariella and Ahuva stayed motivated.

The Jewish matchmaker

Matchmakers access members’ profiles to find and suggest potential matches, and members can also search the data base to see limited information about members, excluding photos, names, and contact details. Tens of thousands of Jewish singles and marrieds alike have done so through Rebbetzen Esther Jungreis’ Hineini organization. Many married couples first met each other at a Hineni class or social gathering for singles. Hineni also offers matchmaking services. Each year, Inbar celebrates a number of weddings for men and women who have met thanks to its services.

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Jewish matchmaking won’t stop for coronavirus — but it has moved online

In fact, growing up in her Orthodox Jewish community, trying to lose weight was as routine as any other ritual. While Sara, now 25, says pressure to diet and lose weight came from various family members, the emphasis on being thin seemed to stem from a deeper, core obligation in the Orthodox community: getting married. According to the Pew Research Center , 68 percent of Orthodox Jews and 75 percent of Haredi the most traditionally observant Jews in America marry at the age of 24 or younger, compared to 33 percent of the overall population of Jewish Americans.

Data on eating disorders within the Jewish community, and especially the Orthodox community, is nearly impossible to find. A New York Times report cited an unpublished study of an Orthodox high school in Brooklyn, where eating disorders among girls in the school were reported to be about 50 percent higher than the national rate at the time. The Times also pointed to a study of students in Toronto, which found 25 percent of Jewish Canadian girls aged 13 to 20 suffered from clinically diagnosable eating disorders, compared to 18 percent of non-Jewish Canadian girls in the study sample.

Matchmaking is particularly popular among Orthodox Jews, some of whom seek a partner within a very insular community. Haaretz, an Israeli.

By Liana Satenstein. Photographed by Gillian Laub. There are layers, both literal and spiritual, to getting dressed as a Hasidic person or an ultra-Orthodox Jew. There is, of course, a skirt that goes below the knee. Women are not allowed to wear pants. These men will dictate details like wig style or skirt length. In one case, there is Abby Stein, a transgender woman who meets me at a coffee shop near Columbia University, where she is currently studying public policy and gender studies.

Now a trans activist, she was once a rabbi who hailed from a high-ranking Hasidic dynasty, a mishmash of two of the most extreme sects, Bobov and Satmar. She is a direct descendant of the founder of Hasidic Judaism, the Baal Shem Tov, and compares her early life to something like being born into European royalty. Stein eventually left the sect with the help of Footsteps, a nonprofit New York—based organization that provides support to the ultra-Orthodox looking to leave the community. In , Stein officially came out to her parents.

Another woman, who is still a part of a religious community but secretly lives a secular life, will leave her house with pants under her skirt.

Jewish arranged marriage – Judaism 1/4